Posts tagged ‘Human rights’

June 1, 2011

Syrian security officials destroy penis of thirteen year old boy demonstrator and kill him

[Abdul Goldstein, Middle East and African Contributor]

MailOnline Syria’s officials are going all out on the people power demonstrators as shown up by the recent horrific execution of thirteen-year-old Hamza Ali al-Khateeb, which had involved Syrian security forces acting under the orders of the country’s beseiged president, Bashar al-Assad, to destroy the boys penis.

The child had been picked up by Syrian officials in Jiza, a village in Dar’a province of Syria, around a month ago and later on his body punctured like sieve and minus his penis, was returned to his anguished parents. His knees has been destroyed and his  neck broken also.

The family was warned by Syrian police against talking too much, but apparently not enough to persuade them to go along with the unspeakable act of cruelty out of fear of being hurt. As a result, the father has been arrested and might probably be facing the same fate as his son.

The news of the boy that shocked the world was posted on YouTube, apparently by a family member, as after the rebellion against the president which in fact had turned into a civil war, Syria was shut to the members of  the international press.

However, it seems that instead of daunting the rebels, the murder has inspired a wave of fierce protests against the injustice of the current regime. According to expatriated human rights activist Radwan Ziadeh and as reported by the Washington Post, the child has already become one of the most powerful symbols of the revolt.

‘(His death) is the sign of the sadism of the Assad regime and its security forces,’  Radwan said.

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May 25, 2011

G8 Nations warned by powerful action groups – no Internet censorship, or else

[Kuzu Ahmed, Internet Freedom Contributor]

Mail.com: Large Internet information services companies, digital players and Internet activists are warning G8 countries meeting in Paris this week, that if politicians continue to attempt to limit internet access and censor information sharing on the Internet, those restrictions will become increasingly irrelevant as they will be deliberately circumvented.

Recent times have seen increasing resistance from the large Internet information services companies like Google and Twitter as well as Internet activists who together have poured cold water on politicians’ censorships on the Internet, which they claim are in contravention of the human right of freedom of expression.

The message was discussed among the leaders of the Group of Eight  – eight of the world’s most influential countries – which began a meeting in France on Thursday to discuss the impact of the Arab uprising which seem to have been enabled by the Internet.

According to Jean-Francois Julliard of Reporters Without Borders “G-8 governments should say very clearly for once that Internet access is a fundamental human right.”  He says that more than 60 countries have Internet restrictions in activity and many are following suit.

Additionally,  Tony Wang, the general manager of the social networking site Twitter, said that Internet censorship is self-defeating and commented that:  “the response to bad speech should be more speech.”

Read more…

March 22, 2011

India goes the way of ‘Gitmo’ with 20,000 detained without charge

BBC News: India, it seems, has gone the way of ‘Gitmo‘ as under its tough Indian Public Safety Act (PSA), the country’s law enforcement agencies are able to detain anyone for up to two years without charges.

So far, around 20,000 people are in Indian detention centres in Kashmir without a trial in sight. This has been going on since 1989 when the region’s violent insurgency had started. Essentially, the law is used to enable long-term detention of people against whom no good evidence can be presented for a trial. 

BBC News reports that Bikramjeet Batra, Amnesty’s campaigner for Asia Pacific programme in India, said:“The Jammu and Kashmir authorities are using PSA detentions as a revolving door to keep people they can’t or won’t convict through proper legal channels locked up and out of the way… ..hundreds of people are being held each year on spurious grounds, with many exposed to higher risk of torture and other forms of ill-treatment” .

It is reported that the detainees are from a wide range of individuals, including: political leaders, suspected insurgents, activists, lawyers, journalists, protestors and some of them are children. When apprehended, they are usually harshly treated and some are tortured. They do not have access to any legal representation.

Amnesty International has called for the law to be cancelled and has been critical of the country’s judiciary for its ‘blind-eyeing’ of the detainees’ human rights. In the meantime, world leaders have been silent on the matter.

[Human Rights Contributor]